From GMO food to Gene Editing Food. What can possibly go wrong?

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Current plant breeding methods utilize both conventional and molecular methods, but a new method has been introduced that no one has heard of: Gene editing food that never grows mold. The BioTechnology uses plant and fungal genome editing to enhance plant disease resistance using the CRISPR/Cas9 System.

The most natural and nutrient rich crop is the one using conventional breeding strategies including pure line selection, pedigree, interspecific hybrids, and back-cross methods, acquiring the nutrients from soil (these nutrients and minerals are then absorbed into our bodies after ingestion). These BioTech crops are often grown in chemically saturated water lacking these natural-occurring nutrients.

GMOs alternatively, change the molecular structure containing a variation within multiple genes, marker-assisted breeding, transgenic and tissue culture methods, gene silencing, and the addition of external chemicals like pesticides or antibiotics embedded in the plant’s molecules.

Unfortunately, GMOs are a real burden for those people who have become susceptible and getting sick eating GMOs ingredients.

Gene Editing Plants.

So instead of going back to organic, the food industry has decided to adopt DNA gene editing technology, invented a decade ago for experimental biotech human DNA (RNA) medications, now  being used for the production of our fruits, vegetables, and edible plants.

The decision to do this is not to help those hopeless souls who have been affected by decades of GMO food, but instead they are doing it for the same old reason: to increase profit aka shelf-life.

The newly invented biotech cell editing plants will contain even less nutrients and will include the pesticides, antibiotics and other artificial chemicals, but they will edit the plan’s DNA in order to remove the mold that naturally grows on the fruit or vegetable. The mold helps us identify rotten produce from fresh produce and informs us. The mold is used as a natural warning that the produce (fruit or vegetable) is no longer suitable for consumption –because its molecules do not longer contain any nutritional beneficial to humans.

Countries like the UK have recently introduced this type of gene editing crops in supermarkets and have removed the expiration date label from its products without telling the consumers they are about to eat an unnatural DNA edited food experiment. UK told consumers that it is up to consumers to figure out if the produce is good or not. Question is, how can consumer know when an apple is bad if the mold has been edited out from the apple’s DNA. Hey, but at least the government announced it.

In the U.S., supermarkets simply began selling fruits and vegetables during the pandemic without any label or warning or announcement

What do these new produce look like?

Almost as if they were made of plastic: odorless and tasteless tomatoes, oranges and cucumbers with hard skin or green salads with hard leaves, peppers that melt and turn into water balloons, onions with rings are not horizontal but vertical, avocados with soft pit or no pit at all, tangerines that never decomposed for months, zucchini that melts and turns into a water balloon, and forever young strawberries but death at the cellular level.

Almost as if they were made out of plastic: odorless and tasteless tomatoes, oranges and cucumbers with hard skin or green salads with hard leaves, onions wich rings are not horizontal but vertical, avocados with soft pit or no pit at all, tangerines that never decomposed for months, zucchini that melts and turns into a water balloon, and forever young strawberries but death at the cellular level.” said Dr. Laura Lee, a nutricionist at the Brooking clinic.

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Now lets talk about a paper published by these out of their mind “scientist” to explain the biotech behind their Frankenstein plants:

Although MNs, ZFNs, and TALENs were applied before the introduction of CRISPR/Cas9, the three techniques have not been widely utilized for plant breeding due to the need for complex protein engineering systems. The increasing number of recent reports for plant genome editing using the CRISPR/Cas9 system indicates that this approach is practical to apply due to its higher success rate and ease of use. The CRISPR/Cas9 system has been applied to enhance multiple beneficial traits of plants including the improvement of disease resistance (Borrelli et al., 2018; Langner et al., 2018; Yin and Qiu, 2019; Zaynab et al., 2020). In addition to applications in plants, genes encoding proteins that interact between host plants and fungal and oomycete pathogens have been targeted by CRISPR/Cas9 to elucidate the underlying molecular mechanism of host-pathogen recognition and to generate screening systems for disease resistance (Fang and Tyler, 2016; Li et al., 2018).

To date, most reviews of plant disease resistance using the CRISPR/Cas9 system have focused primarily on plant genome modifications (Borrelli et al., 2018; Langner et al., 2018; Yin and Qiu, 2019; Zaynab et al., 2020). In this review, we provide an overview of studies using CRISPR/Cas9-mediated genome editing of host plants and fungal/oomycete pathogens for improving disease resistance. We also describe CRISPR/Cas9 and CRISPR/Cpf1 systems in plants and fungi/oomycetes and conclude with limitations and future perspectives for plant disease resistance through genome editing of host and pathogen.

Read full paper👇

Application of CRISPR/Cas9 and CRISPR/Cpf1 Systems in Plant

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